Tag Archives: BJD

doll-fan.com • Full Set BJD Planetdoll Riz in BlueBerry*Bunny

doll-fan.com • Full Set BJD Planetdoll Riz in BlueBerry*Bunny

“Me and my Mom decided to do a full set girl. This is a BJD planetdoll Riz, that I have given a face up and full body blushing, and of course my Mom designed her outfit. We had so much fun creating her.”

via doll-fan.com • View topic – Full Set BJD Planetdoll Riz in BlueBerry*Bunny.

doll-fan.com • Full Set BJD Planetdoll Riz in BlueBerry*Bunny

LDoll Festival BJD logo

LDoll Festival in Lyon, France, October 8-9, 2011

LDoll Festival BJD logo

“Ldoll Festival is back for its second edition on October 8-9, 2011!

Encompassing 1000 m² (10 764 square feet) of exhibition space entirely devoted to Asian Ball-jointed Dolls (BJDs), Ldoll Festival awaits all collectors, artists and doll lovers for two days of exhibition, contests, fun and sales.

We are grateful for all your feedback on the first edition and we are doing our best to take your wishes and comments into account to improve this year’s Festival. Enjoy a friendly, easy-going atmosphere, and look forward to:

  • Contests (photography, customization, best booth award) with many great prizes for the winners from our sponsors.
  • A meet-up area for the biggest BJD party in Europe.
  • Doll exhibitions and photo galleries.
  • A big second-hand shop.
  • Funny, easy games and short activities to lighten your day and have a good time.”

via LDoll Festival.

Clever girl! | The Human Race(s), standards of beauty & the BJD [ball jointed doll] hobby

“On Friday, I decided to start a discussion thread on a popular doll-collector message board to talk about the ways that dolls with tan & dark brown ‘skin tones’ are frequently presented in promotional photos. With these dolls, the eyes & wigs can easily be changed & most collectors customise their dolls to at least that degree, so the eyes & wig in the promo shots aren’t terribly important, but I do think they say something about perceptions of beauty when it comes to people & dolls with these skin tones.”

via Clever girl! | The Human Race(s), standards of beauty & the BJD [ball jointed doll] hobby.

marcel BJD by Dorota

Photo-interview with Marcel the BJD by finallyiamnoone (part 2)

In the second part of his interview, Marcel tells us about his clothes, how to create the perfect character, and BJD photography.

marcel BJD by Dorota

BJDmagazine: Marcel, you have wonderful clothes. Do you make them yourself?

Oh, those are just a modest boy’s clothes. Some of them I got from older boys, some were given to me by Dorota. I can’t sew, but I do mend my socks by myself! And as far as I know, Dorota is planning on making some clothes for me when she finds some time.

marcel BJD by Dorota

BJDmagazine: What part did photography play in the creation of your character?

Oh, it has everything to do with a concept of me as a doll. First of all, as you already know, the idea of me as a character came from photographs. What is also very important, is that the main trigger for Dorota to start her BJD collection was to have models for her photography, as she loves photographing toys and all sorts of miniatures. The last, but not least, is that I’m a photographer myself.  I have few cameras of my own – one of them is a twin lens reflex Rolleiflex, which is not really from my era, but as far as I know Dorota always wanted to have it, so she bought a tiny replica for me. This is definitely my favourite one.

marcel BJD by Dorota

BJDmagazine: Marcel, you have very natural boy poses in the pictures. What advice can you give our readers to create realistic poses?

I think the trick is to remember, than even though we are dolls, we’re designed to resemble human beings, so we should also pose like humans. It’s all about observing people around you, how they sit, stand, walk and run. How they put their hands in their pockets. What do kids do when they play? Then try to recreate your observations in your doll’s poses.

marcel BJD by Dorota

BJDmagazine: Dorota’s pictures are vibrant, and full of life. How does she achieve such vibrancy?

Dorota uses mainly traditional, film cameras, some of them really old. We believe the analog photos have a certain feel that cannot be imitated by a digital camera. They also have a random factor that we really like. You can take a whole roll of film and have only one good photo, but that one photo makes up for all of the lost frames. And you never know what you’ll get until you have your film developed. When we do colour photography, we try to pick films that have vibrant colours – that’s just theyway we prefer them. We almost always take photos in natural light. And we can spend hours framing our subject and moving objects to get the best composition. We know that patience pays and pictures taken in a rush are never good ones.

marcel BJD by Dorota

BJDmagazine: Marcel, you are a complete little boy. What advice would you give our readers for them to create a whole character?

Just follow your heart and stick to one vision. You don’t have to create whole elaborate stories – your character will evolve by itself once you give it its basic shape, its “soul”.

marcel BJD by Dorota

BJDmagazine: What are you up to now? Are you going to share more adventures with us?

Well, I don’t know what time will bring. I know I need a restringing before the spring comes if I want to wander around the city. I might get a bike, maybe go on a trip somewhere… But, as most of our ideas are quite spontaneous, we can’t foresee anything!

marcel BJD by Dorota

You can find Dorota Majzer on: 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/finallyiamnoone/

Her Photo Blog: cacheedanslaforet.blogspot.com

Her Etsy Shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/cacheedanslaforet

Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.

 

Dorota - Marcel portrait of a BJD

Photo-interview with Marcel the BJD by finallyiamnoone (part 1)

In her childhood, Dorota used to play with dolls as much as any other girl, but when she grew up she became sentimental and decided she wanted to preserve some of her childhood memories, and she developed a big love for toys, especially miniatures. Photographing them makes her most happy, and she would love to be described as a “toy photographer”. Creating elaborate characters has never been her main goal, rather, she concentrates on conveying certain stories and feelings through her photos. She developed the following photo interview with her character, Marcel.

Dorota - marcel - BJD

Hello Marcel, could you introduce yourself? Where do you come from?

Marcel: Umm, hello, my name is Marcel, I’m around 11 years old, though I don’t know my exact age. My uncle was Lewis Hine, an american photographer famous for his child labour photos. Actually, I’m one of the boys from his photos – a working class child living in Great Depression times somewhere in United States. I’m a newsie – I sell newspapers. I also do other things to make my living. I am lucky to be able to read – other boys I know never had the opportunity to learn their A, B, C’s.

I’m quite shy and I usually have my head in the clouds, thinking about far journeys and distant lands.

Dorota - Marcel on a branch - BJD

I know you’re aware that you are a Ball Jointed Doll – can you tell us what sculpt you are? What made Dorota pick this particular sculpt?

Haha, yes, I know I’m a BJD – Dorota has always been pretty open with me about it. I am a Custom House Ange Ai Uri, and the story behind picking this particular sculpt is quite interesting: Dorota ordered another doll from that company and was offered a bonus doll. She picked Uri, but had no idea what to do with it – but once she got that “Lewis Hine’s boy” idea she almost forgot about the first doll and when we both came from Korea, she sold her pretty fast, being totally fascinated with the idea of developing my character.

Dorota - marcel - BJD

Tell us about your face-up.  What makes you look like a boy?

I didn’t want a custom face-up for myself, as Uri mold is female in default. But we knew it would make a great boy, so we decided to try. The face-up and blushing was done by a great Polish artist, Eloe, and is all I was dreaming about – a ginger head, freckled boy, maybe of Irish descent. I didn’t want a gloss on my lips, I think it’s for girls and sissies. I have lots of freckles on my back and arms as well and I like them. I have to admit my nails are a bit dirty, but that’s what you get spending so much time out on the streets.

Dorota - Marcel playing - BJD

Tell us more about your wig. Do you have recommendations on how to best style a boy wig?

Well why should I care about my wig? I think the best way to style my hair is just to let it live it’s own life. They’re all messy and I like it like that!

Dorota - Marcel the photographer - BJD

Please join us for the second part of this interview on Tuesday at 9 AM Boston time.

You can find Dorota Majzer on: 

 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/finallyiamnoone/

Her Photo Blog: cacheedanslaforet.blogspot.com

Her Etsy Shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/cacheedanslaforet

Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.

 

Linda Gavin BJD Clearview Dollhouse

Linda Gavin: BJD Interior Designer (Part 2)

In the second installment of our interview Linda talks about furniture, accessories for your BJD dollhouse, and shares some photo tips with us.

BJDmagazine: Your doll house has beautiful furniture. What are your favorite sources of miniature furniture?

Linda: I love the custom-made pieces the most because I love the originals. I love the REAC series of designer furniture too. The Eames Elephant is on my wish list. I bough one for my son in 1:1, and I hope to make a miniature version of his room one day.

Linda Gavin BJD Dollhouse

BJDmagazine: You chose wonderful accessories for your BJDs to “play” with. What are your favorite sources?

Linda: Cellphone charms and keychain charms are my favorites! I find them on eBay and various online stores, but also in normal stores near where I live. I get a lot of gifts from friends and they find stuff everywhere too. You can just not get enough of miniature toys :)

Linda Gavin BJD Dollhouse

BJDmagazine: What are your sources for wallpaper and rugs? Can you give us advice with regards to pattern choices?

Linda: eBay and The Doll House Emporium. You can find exciting stuff in the train hobby shops too. Especially if you’re making a garden.

BJDmagazine: What are your inspirations for your dollhouses? Do you have favorite dollhouse creators?

Linda: http://www.flickr.com/people/anninja Annina Diston is my hero. Look at her work, it’s so realistic! I love it. http://www.flickr.com/photos/10657188@N07/ Helle Gavin makes room boxes and can change interiors in the blink of an eye. She has thousands of miniature items, and updates her flickr stream on a weekly basis. I love seeing what her toys are up to. My main inspiration comes from the world of interior design and photography.

Linda Gavin BJD Clearview Dollhouse

BJDmagazine: What advice would you give our readers for taking great photographs of their BJDs in their miniature world?

Linda: The lighting and lens are the key to taking great photographs. Play with the light. Use real light, desk lamps, candles. Use a tripod so you can take crisp photos with long exposure time in the evening. It’s really nice to take small houses outside, to the forest, beach, or to a creepy alley. Let your imagination run wild. You can create very interesting photographs if you change the environment. And while you’re at it, why not make a little stop motion film?

Linda Gavin Victorian BJD Dollhouse

BJDmagazine: If you were to give advice to a first time dollhouse builder, what would it be?

Linda:  Take your time finding and buying accessories for your  house or you will run out of space very quickly and wish you had bought a bigger house. Enjoy the process of finishing your first miniature home since this is the most exciting part of the hobby. Read reviews keep track of the market value.

Linda Gavin Clearview BJD Dollhouse

BJDmagazine: Is it more fun to have a dollhouse for your BJDs? Why?

Linda: Everyone needs a home :) It’s a good place to store your dolls and miniatures, and to take photos. The dollhouses makes great backgrounds for toy photography. I’m very amused by the dolls in the house. It wouldn’t be the same without them.

Linda Gavin BJD Dollhouse

(All images are the property of Linda Gavin.)

You can find Linda Gavin on: 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jusum/

Her Photo Blog: http://www.mokona.org/

Her Toy Blog: http://www.jusum.com/blog/

Her Website: http://portfolio.jusum.com/

Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.

 

2234820180_2d92df9937_o

Linda Gavin: BJD Interior Designer (Part 1)

Linda Gavin is known in the BJD world for her wonderful dollhouse interiors. In the first installment of our interview with her, Linda talks about her dollhouses, and gives us simple advice on how to create our own, while delighting us with her wonderful photographs.

BJDmagazine: Have you always had dollhouses? When did you start making your own?

Linda: I had a Lundby house as a kid, but I think my mother sold it at the flee market.

Victorian BJD Dollhouse by Linda Gavin

BJDmagazine: What made you decide to create a dollhouse for your BJDs? What size BJD did you create your dollhouse for? What scale is your house in?

Linda: I decided to buy my first house when FairyLand announced their new series of PukiPukis that fits in a 1:12 scaled world. I’m interested in interior design and in creating worlds and homes for toys.  So, in 2007, I started creating more realistic surroundings for my toys.

Victorian BJD Dollhouse by Linda Gavin

BJDmagazine: Can you tell us more about scale and what it really means?

Linda: 1:1 is the size of the real world and 1:12 is a 12th of it. For example, if a ceiling is 12 feet high in real life, then in a 1:12 scale dollhouse the ceiling is 1 foot high.

Victorian BJD Cafe by Linda Gavin

BJDmagazine: What was the first dollhouse you created for them? Why did you first chose that style?

Linda: I chose to buy a Victorian dollhouse because I didn’t know that there were modern houses out there. It was only 70€, came with windows, and was easy to assemble. So it was a good house to start with.

Victorian BJD Dollhouse by Linda Gavin

BJDmagazine: What attracted you to the Clearview House and the Pod M112?

Linda: I’m attracted to minimalism and contemporary design. I loved the Clearview house because of the open spaces.

M112 BJD Pod by Linda Gavin

BJDmagazine: Did you plan a lot before starting the decoration of the houses? Can you describe the process for us?

Linda: It’s just like planning to move in to a new house. I get a lot of inspiration fromFlickr and interior design magazines like Elle and Dwell. I purchase items from eBay, and custom order design pieces from miniature artists. I also print lamp shades, wallpapers, and artwork for framing.

M112 BJD Pod by Linda Gavin

BJDmagazine: How long does it take to complete a dollhouse?

Linda: It can take anywhere from a few hours to years. I will never finish my Clearview house.

BJDmagazine: What are the most important points to keep in mind when designing a dollhouse?

Linda: If you’re a newbie, buy a house that is easy to assemble and doesn’t take up more space than you can spare. If you fall in love with this hobby, you might want to buy more houses, so it’s good if you can stack them, or hang them on the wall. It can be very expensive to buy a house and all the furniture, so it’s good to make a plan before you start buying,  because you might not be able to buy everything at once. Do you want electricity in your house or will you go for LED? Do you want a 1:12 scaled house or do you want to get a playscale (Barbie-sized) house for your taller BJDs? Dollhouses are often fragile, and the longer they’re traveling, the bigger the risk that it’s broken when it arrives. Paris’ Pods are very sturdy though. They would survive a planecrash.

There’s another alternative to dollhouses. You don’t need a house that looks like one from the outside, but something that looks like a house from the inside. You can build your own room boxes from things you find at IKEA, such as IKEA cube shelving. A box room will look nice if you buy some windows, wallpaper, and flooring. Even pictures of windows can look great.

M112 BJD Pod by Linda Gavin

(All images are the property of Linda Gavin.)

Join us Thursday, 9 am (Boston time), for the second part of our interview with Linda!

You can find Linda Gavin on: 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jusum/

Her Photo Blog: http://www.mokona.org/

Her Toy Blog: http://www.jusum.com/blog/

Her Website: http://portfolio.jusum.com/

Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.

 

 

FairyLand Minifee Shushu

Having Fun with your new BJD! by Lea Mars (Part 3)

So, now you have the wig, eyes, and doll! When everything has arrived, the fun begins! You can finally have fun with your doll! There are many things you can do with your doll. You can give him/her a name, invent a whole character…write stories, RPG, let your doll connect to other dolls through the forum. But, your doll is still naked! So you can buy clothes, or make them yourself! There are many free tutorials, which you can find by searching online and visiting your favorite forums. You can also make jewelery, shoes, furniture. You name it, and you can make it! Be creative…that’s what BJD’s are for!

FairyLand Minifee Shushu

Then, last but not least, one of the most important and fun stages. Showing off your doll on the interwebz! If you want to take pictures of your doll, there are many things to take into account. You need a camera, a set up.. and a doll, of course. Your pictures say a lot about your dolls. You can have a very pretty doll, but if your pictures are horrible…your doll won’t look so nice. You don’t need a high quality camera to make good pictures. Just try to make sure you follow a few simple rules (for beginners):

  • Make sure there is enough light. Preferably sun or daylight. Lamps can give an ugly yellow glow that doesn’t look good.
  • Watch your background. You can use a wall or paper to get a clear background, but even if you just take a picture of your doll in your room. Nobody wants to see all your dirty laundry on your bed. Just move it to the side so it won’t be in the picture!
  • Watch the position of the eyes. If you pose the eyes slightly to the side (so that your doll looks to the left/right) it looks more natural.
  • This also goes for the doll itself. Try to pose it naturally. You can let your doll lean against a wall for extra support.
  • If your doll has really difficulty posing, consider restringing the elastic inside your doll that holds the parts together. There are many re-stringing tutorials online that show you how to take your doll apart & put the elastic back with the right amount of tension for better posing!

FairyLand Minifee Shushu

I hope you got some useful tips from my 3 articles. There are so many things that you can do with BJDs, that I probably forgot to mention most of them. Just remember that you should have fun with them. Let your imagination run wild!

~Lea Mars