Category Archives: Photography

marcel BJD by Dorota

Photo-interview with Marcel the BJD by finallyiamnoone (part 2)

In the second part of his interview, Marcel tells us about his clothes, how to create the perfect character, and BJD photography.

marcel BJD by Dorota

BJDmagazine: Marcel, you have wonderful clothes. Do you make them yourself?

Oh, those are just a modest boy’s clothes. Some of them I got from older boys, some were given to me by Dorota. I can’t sew, but I do mend my socks by myself! And as far as I know, Dorota is planning on making some clothes for me when she finds some time.

marcel BJD by Dorota

BJDmagazine: What part did photography play in the creation of your character?

Oh, it has everything to do with a concept of me as a doll. First of all, as you already know, the idea of me as a character came from photographs. What is also very important, is that the main trigger for Dorota to start her BJD collection was to have models for her photography, as she loves photographing toys and all sorts of miniatures. The last, but not least, is that I’m a photographer myself.  I have few cameras of my own – one of them is a twin lens reflex Rolleiflex, which is not really from my era, but as far as I know Dorota always wanted to have it, so she bought a tiny replica for me. This is definitely my favourite one.

marcel BJD by Dorota

BJDmagazine: Marcel, you have very natural boy poses in the pictures. What advice can you give our readers to create realistic poses?

I think the trick is to remember, than even though we are dolls, we’re designed to resemble human beings, so we should also pose like humans. It’s all about observing people around you, how they sit, stand, walk and run. How they put their hands in their pockets. What do kids do when they play? Then try to recreate your observations in your doll’s poses.

marcel BJD by Dorota

BJDmagazine: Dorota’s pictures are vibrant, and full of life. How does she achieve such vibrancy?

Dorota uses mainly traditional, film cameras, some of them really old. We believe the analog photos have a certain feel that cannot be imitated by a digital camera. They also have a random factor that we really like. You can take a whole roll of film and have only one good photo, but that one photo makes up for all of the lost frames. And you never know what you’ll get until you have your film developed. When we do colour photography, we try to pick films that have vibrant colours – that’s just theyway we prefer them. We almost always take photos in natural light. And we can spend hours framing our subject and moving objects to get the best composition. We know that patience pays and pictures taken in a rush are never good ones.

marcel BJD by Dorota

BJDmagazine: Marcel, you are a complete little boy. What advice would you give our readers for them to create a whole character?

Just follow your heart and stick to one vision. You don’t have to create whole elaborate stories – your character will evolve by itself once you give it its basic shape, its “soul”.

marcel BJD by Dorota

BJDmagazine: What are you up to now? Are you going to share more adventures with us?

Well, I don’t know what time will bring. I know I need a restringing before the spring comes if I want to wander around the city. I might get a bike, maybe go on a trip somewhere… But, as most of our ideas are quite spontaneous, we can’t foresee anything!

marcel BJD by Dorota

You can find Dorota Majzer on: 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/finallyiamnoone/

Her Photo Blog: cacheedanslaforet.blogspot.com

Her Etsy Shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/cacheedanslaforet

Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.

 

Dorota - Marcel portrait of a BJD

Photo-interview with Marcel the BJD by finallyiamnoone (part 1)

In her childhood, Dorota used to play with dolls as much as any other girl, but when she grew up she became sentimental and decided she wanted to preserve some of her childhood memories, and she developed a big love for toys, especially miniatures. Photographing them makes her most happy, and she would love to be described as a “toy photographer”. Creating elaborate characters has never been her main goal, rather, she concentrates on conveying certain stories and feelings through her photos. She developed the following photo interview with her character, Marcel.

Dorota - marcel - BJD

Hello Marcel, could you introduce yourself? Where do you come from?

Marcel: Umm, hello, my name is Marcel, I’m around 11 years old, though I don’t know my exact age. My uncle was Lewis Hine, an american photographer famous for his child labour photos. Actually, I’m one of the boys from his photos – a working class child living in Great Depression times somewhere in United States. I’m a newsie – I sell newspapers. I also do other things to make my living. I am lucky to be able to read – other boys I know never had the opportunity to learn their A, B, C’s.

I’m quite shy and I usually have my head in the clouds, thinking about far journeys and distant lands.

Dorota - Marcel on a branch - BJD

I know you’re aware that you are a Ball Jointed Doll – can you tell us what sculpt you are? What made Dorota pick this particular sculpt?

Haha, yes, I know I’m a BJD – Dorota has always been pretty open with me about it. I am a Custom House Ange Ai Uri, and the story behind picking this particular sculpt is quite interesting: Dorota ordered another doll from that company and was offered a bonus doll. She picked Uri, but had no idea what to do with it – but once she got that “Lewis Hine’s boy” idea she almost forgot about the first doll and when we both came from Korea, she sold her pretty fast, being totally fascinated with the idea of developing my character.

Dorota - marcel - BJD

Tell us about your face-up.  What makes you look like a boy?

I didn’t want a custom face-up for myself, as Uri mold is female in default. But we knew it would make a great boy, so we decided to try. The face-up and blushing was done by a great Polish artist, Eloe, and is all I was dreaming about – a ginger head, freckled boy, maybe of Irish descent. I didn’t want a gloss on my lips, I think it’s for girls and sissies. I have lots of freckles on my back and arms as well and I like them. I have to admit my nails are a bit dirty, but that’s what you get spending so much time out on the streets.

Dorota - Marcel playing - BJD

Tell us more about your wig. Do you have recommendations on how to best style a boy wig?

Well why should I care about my wig? I think the best way to style my hair is just to let it live it’s own life. They’re all messy and I like it like that!

Dorota - Marcel the photographer - BJD

Please join us for the second part of this interview on Tuesday at 9 AM Boston time.

You can find Dorota Majzer on: 

 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/finallyiamnoone/

Her Photo Blog: cacheedanslaforet.blogspot.com

Her Etsy Shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/cacheedanslaforet

Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.

 

Linda Gavin BJD Clearview Dollhouse

Linda Gavin: BJD Interior Designer (Part 2)

In the second installment of our interview Linda talks about furniture, accessories for your BJD dollhouse, and shares some photo tips with us.

BJDmagazine: Your doll house has beautiful furniture. What are your favorite sources of miniature furniture?

Linda: I love the custom-made pieces the most because I love the originals. I love the REAC series of designer furniture too. The Eames Elephant is on my wish list. I bough one for my son in 1:1, and I hope to make a miniature version of his room one day.

Linda Gavin BJD Dollhouse

BJDmagazine: You chose wonderful accessories for your BJDs to “play” with. What are your favorite sources?

Linda: Cellphone charms and keychain charms are my favorites! I find them on eBay and various online stores, but also in normal stores near where I live. I get a lot of gifts from friends and they find stuff everywhere too. You can just not get enough of miniature toys :)

Linda Gavin BJD Dollhouse

BJDmagazine: What are your sources for wallpaper and rugs? Can you give us advice with regards to pattern choices?

Linda: eBay and The Doll House Emporium. You can find exciting stuff in the train hobby shops too. Especially if you’re making a garden.

BJDmagazine: What are your inspirations for your dollhouses? Do you have favorite dollhouse creators?

Linda: http://www.flickr.com/people/anninja Annina Diston is my hero. Look at her work, it’s so realistic! I love it. http://www.flickr.com/photos/10657188@N07/ Helle Gavin makes room boxes and can change interiors in the blink of an eye. She has thousands of miniature items, and updates her flickr stream on a weekly basis. I love seeing what her toys are up to. My main inspiration comes from the world of interior design and photography.

Linda Gavin BJD Clearview Dollhouse

BJDmagazine: What advice would you give our readers for taking great photographs of their BJDs in their miniature world?

Linda: The lighting and lens are the key to taking great photographs. Play with the light. Use real light, desk lamps, candles. Use a tripod so you can take crisp photos with long exposure time in the evening. It’s really nice to take small houses outside, to the forest, beach, or to a creepy alley. Let your imagination run wild. You can create very interesting photographs if you change the environment. And while you’re at it, why not make a little stop motion film?

Linda Gavin Victorian BJD Dollhouse

BJDmagazine: If you were to give advice to a first time dollhouse builder, what would it be?

Linda:  Take your time finding and buying accessories for your  house or you will run out of space very quickly and wish you had bought a bigger house. Enjoy the process of finishing your first miniature home since this is the most exciting part of the hobby. Read reviews keep track of the market value.

Linda Gavin Clearview BJD Dollhouse

BJDmagazine: Is it more fun to have a dollhouse for your BJDs? Why?

Linda: Everyone needs a home :) It’s a good place to store your dolls and miniatures, and to take photos. The dollhouses makes great backgrounds for toy photography. I’m very amused by the dolls in the house. It wouldn’t be the same without them.

Linda Gavin BJD Dollhouse

(All images are the property of Linda Gavin.)

You can find Linda Gavin on: 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jusum/

Her Photo Blog: http://www.mokona.org/

Her Toy Blog: http://www.jusum.com/blog/

Her Website: http://portfolio.jusum.com/

Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.

 

2234820180_2d92df9937_o

Linda Gavin: BJD Interior Designer (Part 1)

Linda Gavin is known in the BJD world for her wonderful dollhouse interiors. In the first installment of our interview with her, Linda talks about her dollhouses, and gives us simple advice on how to create our own, while delighting us with her wonderful photographs.

BJDmagazine: Have you always had dollhouses? When did you start making your own?

Linda: I had a Lundby house as a kid, but I think my mother sold it at the flee market.

Victorian BJD Dollhouse by Linda Gavin

BJDmagazine: What made you decide to create a dollhouse for your BJDs? What size BJD did you create your dollhouse for? What scale is your house in?

Linda: I decided to buy my first house when FairyLand announced their new series of PukiPukis that fits in a 1:12 scaled world. I’m interested in interior design and in creating worlds and homes for toys.  So, in 2007, I started creating more realistic surroundings for my toys.

Victorian BJD Dollhouse by Linda Gavin

BJDmagazine: Can you tell us more about scale and what it really means?

Linda: 1:1 is the size of the real world and 1:12 is a 12th of it. For example, if a ceiling is 12 feet high in real life, then in a 1:12 scale dollhouse the ceiling is 1 foot high.

Victorian BJD Cafe by Linda Gavin

BJDmagazine: What was the first dollhouse you created for them? Why did you first chose that style?

Linda: I chose to buy a Victorian dollhouse because I didn’t know that there were modern houses out there. It was only 70€, came with windows, and was easy to assemble. So it was a good house to start with.

Victorian BJD Dollhouse by Linda Gavin

BJDmagazine: What attracted you to the Clearview House and the Pod M112?

Linda: I’m attracted to minimalism and contemporary design. I loved the Clearview house because of the open spaces.

M112 BJD Pod by Linda Gavin

BJDmagazine: Did you plan a lot before starting the decoration of the houses? Can you describe the process for us?

Linda: It’s just like planning to move in to a new house. I get a lot of inspiration fromFlickr and interior design magazines like Elle and Dwell. I purchase items from eBay, and custom order design pieces from miniature artists. I also print lamp shades, wallpapers, and artwork for framing.

M112 BJD Pod by Linda Gavin

BJDmagazine: How long does it take to complete a dollhouse?

Linda: It can take anywhere from a few hours to years. I will never finish my Clearview house.

BJDmagazine: What are the most important points to keep in mind when designing a dollhouse?

Linda: If you’re a newbie, buy a house that is easy to assemble and doesn’t take up more space than you can spare. If you fall in love with this hobby, you might want to buy more houses, so it’s good if you can stack them, or hang them on the wall. It can be very expensive to buy a house and all the furniture, so it’s good to make a plan before you start buying,  because you might not be able to buy everything at once. Do you want electricity in your house or will you go for LED? Do you want a 1:12 scaled house or do you want to get a playscale (Barbie-sized) house for your taller BJDs? Dollhouses are often fragile, and the longer they’re traveling, the bigger the risk that it’s broken when it arrives. Paris’ Pods are very sturdy though. They would survive a planecrash.

There’s another alternative to dollhouses. You don’t need a house that looks like one from the outside, but something that looks like a house from the inside. You can build your own room boxes from things you find at IKEA, such as IKEA cube shelving. A box room will look nice if you buy some windows, wallpaper, and flooring. Even pictures of windows can look great.

M112 BJD Pod by Linda Gavin

(All images are the property of Linda Gavin.)

Join us Thursday, 9 am (Boston time), for the second part of our interview with Linda!

You can find Linda Gavin on: 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jusum/

Her Photo Blog: http://www.mokona.org/

Her Toy Blog: http://www.jusum.com/blog/

Her Website: http://portfolio.jusum.com/

Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.

 

 

FairyLand Minifee Shushu

Having Fun with your new BJD! by Lea Mars (Part 3)

So, now you have the wig, eyes, and doll! When everything has arrived, the fun begins! You can finally have fun with your doll! There are many things you can do with your doll. You can give him/her a name, invent a whole character…write stories, RPG, let your doll connect to other dolls through the forum. But, your doll is still naked! So you can buy clothes, or make them yourself! There are many free tutorials, which you can find by searching online and visiting your favorite forums. You can also make jewelery, shoes, furniture. You name it, and you can make it! Be creative…that’s what BJD’s are for!

FairyLand Minifee Shushu

Then, last but not least, one of the most important and fun stages. Showing off your doll on the interwebz! If you want to take pictures of your doll, there are many things to take into account. You need a camera, a set up.. and a doll, of course. Your pictures say a lot about your dolls. You can have a very pretty doll, but if your pictures are horrible…your doll won’t look so nice. You don’t need a high quality camera to make good pictures. Just try to make sure you follow a few simple rules (for beginners):

  • Make sure there is enough light. Preferably sun or daylight. Lamps can give an ugly yellow glow that doesn’t look good.
  • Watch your background. You can use a wall or paper to get a clear background, but even if you just take a picture of your doll in your room. Nobody wants to see all your dirty laundry on your bed. Just move it to the side so it won’t be in the picture!
  • Watch the position of the eyes. If you pose the eyes slightly to the side (so that your doll looks to the left/right) it looks more natural.
  • This also goes for the doll itself. Try to pose it naturally. You can let your doll lean against a wall for extra support.
  • If your doll has really difficulty posing, consider restringing the elastic inside your doll that holds the parts together. There are many re-stringing tutorials online that show you how to take your doll apart & put the elastic back with the right amount of tension for better posing!

FairyLand Minifee Shushu

I hope you got some useful tips from my 3 articles. There are so many things that you can do with BJDs, that I probably forgot to mention most of them. Just remember that you should have fun with them. Let your imagination run wild!

~Lea Mars

 

Tireless Artist OOAK BJD Dirvolira

The Inspirational Dolls and BJDs of Tireless Artist (Part 1)

In the first installment of our interview with Dorote Zaukaite, also known as Tireless Artist, Dorote introduces us to the world of her unique dolls, from BJDs to ribbon jointed dolls, and dazzles us with her incredible  costumes and wigs.

BJDmagazine: Did you get training as an artist, or are you self-taught?

Dorote: Yes, I’ve got training. I studied in an art college. We had sculpting and painting and drawing and anatomy lessons. I must admit, sculpting and anatomy were my least favorite subjects… How could I know that one day they would become the most useful ones? :)

Tireless Artist OOAK BJD Dirvolira

BJDmagazine: What are your inspirations for your dolls?

Dorote: I get inspired by lots and lots of things. It can be a beautiful misty morning, or some person, or phrase, or feeling or anything else. I love the Gothic and Baroque eras for their costumes; I love the Renaissance just because it was the renaissance. I am interested in history. Dolls are my way of communicating with the world. Sometimes I want to tell a fairy tale and I make some anthropomorphic creature, at other times I want to talk about the roots of humanity so I create an African doll. It is great when people look at my work and see what I am telling them, and it is also fine if they just see a beautiful doll. I am happy as long as my art brings positive emotions.

BJDmagazine: How has your work as a doll-maker evolved over time?

Dorote: My journey as a professional doll artist started when I saw a photo of an Asian BJD for the first time. I was amazed by the way the doll was posing, and by the sadness in her eyes. So I started “digging” for more information and I discovered the magic world of hand made dolls. I just fell in love with the idea of a doll as an art object.

So yes, my first doll was a BJD. However, my head was exploding with ideas and different characters and making BJDs was a really slow process, so I started trying other doll making techniques. This was the reason why many of my early dolls were static. I was experimenting with costuming and searching for my style. I was playing with human body proportions which brought me to that non human thin and tall shape which my dolls have now. Not so long ago, I got inspired by a primitive way of jointing dolls using string, and raised the technique to a new level by making Ribbon Jointed Dolls which do not look primitive at all. At this point, I already know what I want from the aesthetics of my dolls and I see clearly which direction they will evolve; and – most important – I am ready to come back to BJD making.

Tireless Artist OOAK String Jointed Zuri

BJDmagazine: Tell us more about your BJD, Dirvolira. What is your inspiration for her?

Dorote: Dirvolira is an ancient Lithuanian goddness of fields and households. We have very little information about our ancient gods, as Christianity erased them from people’s memory. I wanted to bring her back to life – a fragile forgotten goddess from a deep past.

BJDmagazine: What made you chose this type of articulation. Why are her wrists not ball-jointed?

Dorote: As I’ve mentioned earlier – I felt that I am finally ready to come back to BJDs. This character just had to be BJD, as no other construction could have given her the flexibility I wanted. I just had this image in my mind of a tiny fragile creature rolled into a ball.  About the wrists – it is a playful detail which makes her different from a traditional BJD. (I have to admit I love breaking traditions) The pictures do not show that, but when you handle her, her hands tremble. It is a result of their construction – and works perfectly with the image I wanted to create.

BJDmagazine: What material did you chose to create her with? Why? What role does texture play in Dirvolira’s character?

Dorote: I have sculpted Dirvolira from Plastiform. It is strong and perfect for a doll constructed that way.

I’ve preserved the beautiful texture of the modeling clay, and even have left some micro scratches on purpose to give her an antique look. I have also used pencil and pastels instead of acrylics or other paints just to give her that roughness which makes her unique.

I like antique things and I like natural materials – you can see that in my dolls as I always do my best to keep that spirit.

Tireless Artist OOAK BJD Dirvolira

BJDmagazine: Dirvolira’s body is adorned with tattoos. Can you tell us more about the meaning of tattoos in your work?

Dorote: Dirvolira is a goddess of fields so I have used plant motifs as tattoos to emphasize her connection with nature.

I love when hand-made dolls are decorated with ornaments. That is what makes them special and unique. When I see a nude doll – it looks like a toy, but when I am looking at a doll that is decorated with drawings or paintings – I see a work of art.

BJDmagazine: How do you chose the materials for the costumes? Does each element have a symbolic value?

Dorote: I look at a doll as at a complete work of art. All her details must flow one into another. There must be harmony between the doll and her costume – colors, ornaments, texture – it is a whole. The color of Dirvolira’s hair echoes the pencil drawings on her body. Her natural silk skirt looks like a mist floating above the fields and her flax corset reminds us that flax was the main fiber used in clothing by ancient Lithuanians. So in the end the doll has something from fantasy and something from history.

Tireless Artist Cleo OOAK Doll The Stray Cat

BJDmagazine: Why do you chose to paint the eyes of your dolls, rather than use glass eyes?

Dorote: It is all about the style of doll I create. Sometimes I make glasslike eyes myself so they fit the character, at other times I paint them as that fits the style of a doll better. My latest dolls are more and more stylized and glass eyes would just look strange and unnatural.

BJDmagazine: Your costumes are incredibly detailed. What is their role in the creation of your characters? Can you elaborate?

Dorote: Yes. I pay a lot of attention to costuming. It is the costume that creates a character. There is so much room for imagination in costume creating. I always say that a doll without a costume is just a half piece (unless she is tattooed of course).

I like when the dolls are nice to touch and I am thinking of that while choosing fabrics. However, they are art pieces first of all, so they must be eye-catching. All the detail I add to their costumes makes them special. They attract your attention and you never get bored looking at them. I also believe, that while holding my doll in your hands you can feel the whole love and energy I have put into her.

Costuming my dolls takes as long  or even longer than sculpting. High quality fabrics are sewn and embroidered by hand. I use lots of beads, which all are attached with thread. Sometimes I dye fabrics to get the exact color I need for the character. A real work of art must have lots of hand work and it must be resistant to aging as much as possible. That is why I choose sewing instead of using glue everywhere where it is possible even when it takes more time.

Tireless Artist OOAK Ribbon Jointed Anne Bolleyn

Join us Thursday, 9 a.m. (Boston time) for the second installment of this wonderful interview with Tireless Artist.

You can find Tireless Artist on: 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/handmadebjd/

Her Blog: http://tirelessartist.blogspot.com/

Her Etsy Shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/tirelessartist

Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.

 

Esthy ROSA NEBULOSA

Interview with Esthy, French BJD Photographer (Part 3)

In the  third and last installment of our interview with Esthy, she tells us about naming her BJD girls and creating their face-ups.

BJDmagazine: How do you select names for you characters? Do you give a lot of importance to the name?

Esthy: Most of the time, I don’t select a name for them until their customization is finished. This way, I can stay much closer to their personality. With few exceptions, give them real first names. When I don’t, it is because the character is completely identified by her name. Belladone (deadly nightshade), for example,  is a poisoner; and Nini P’tit  Cœur (Nini Little Heart) is a circus artist.

My Lati dolls all have the names of cakes and sweets because they are in a world apart from the others. They are not even in the same glass case. I knew exactly what I wanted to do with Poudre and Chloé (in reference to Mylène Farmer’s song) even before they arrived.

Names are rather important because they more or less define the character.

Esthy Beautiful monster

BJDmagazine: Do you do the face-ups for your BJDs? What guides you in your choices?

Esthy: I just try to give a face to my doll that I will like and which will bring out the doll, that will make me love her. A doll without a face seems to me to be perfectly insipid and uninteresting. I like faces that have a lot of dimension and are very blushed. I’ve made a lot of progress since my first face-up five years ago. In order to evolve, I listened to and accepted critique. I learned to use different materials, I tried new methods to get better results. I try not to fall back on what I know. I try to constantly reinvent myself, to not always do the same face-ups. To make progress, I also relied on the precious advice of some of my talented friends.

Esthy 1920

BJDmagazine: In all your face-ups, the eyes are delicately made-up with iridescent powders, eye brows are barely visible.The mouths seem to attract attention, and become responsible for the emotion. Why? What is your secret for mouths that are so alive?

Esthy: I also have dolls where the accent is placed on the gaze, it depends on how the sculpt inspires me. But it is true that I love pastel colors, soft, which can create a big contrast for example between large dark circles under the eyes and a well worked mouth. I like BJDs when they have beautiful mouths that are well defined. Plump mouths are even better. For me, the most beautiful lips are those of the unoa Lusis.

The fuller the mouth is, the more details one can paint and the more one can work on the volume. The final touch, gloss, is absolutely indispensable. The brilliance gives the pout, the smile, a more intense expression to the doll. I like dolls with beautiful mouths and nice cheeks!

Esthy Laces

BJDmagazine: You like freckles. How do you make them so delicate?

Esthy: I adore freckles, they can give so much personality to certain dolls! I make them with very diluted acrylic paint to keep a transparent effect, which I think is very important. I dilute the paint more or less, according to the effect I desire. I then try to place them in the most appropriate locations for the doll and the expression I want to give her.

BJDmagazine: What are your inspirations for face-ups?

Esthy: Like everyone, I have favorite BJD makeup artists. Even though I adopt techniques used by multiple face-up artists, I don’t inspire myself from any one artist in particular. I attempt to do something that seems more or less realistic, even if the sculpt of the doll isn’t at all [realistic]. I love the transparency of the faces and the soft colors of the magnificent paintings of Mark Ryden, but I also love the the delicacy of the features of Pre-Raphaelite paintings. I like the faces of some artists’ dolls, like the dolls of Julien Martinez, Lillycat, Nicole Marschollek and Anne Mitrani. I like many things, but I always try to be original and to only dig into my imagination.  Even so, I know very well we are always influenced by someone else, whether we want it or not.

Esthy Alice and the bunnies

BJDmagazine: You do face-ups on commission. Is it very different for you to paint one of your dolls or to paint for a commission?

Esthy: It depends on what I am asked to do. I don’t accept commissions for work that is completely different from what I normally do. I try to redirect people towards artists that can better match their desires. For my work to succeed, I have to like the doll and the face-up concept. It is always a delicate thing to do a face-up for another person, especially if you don’t know them personally. You can’t always be certain that they will like the result, and the photos sent are not always faithful renditions of the final result. My biggest fear is to let down the person who put their confidence in me. But doing face-ups on BJDs is a real pleasure for me, I love doing it. I like discovering new sculpts, and nothing is more gratifying than when a person is happy with the face-up I did for their BJD.

Esthy Not so wise

BJDmagazine: “Poudre”. Could it be you, playing with flowers, jewels, and make-up?

Esthy: Poudre is a little doll that is a little bit of a mascot for me, she incarnates my vision of femininity. I like to wear makeup and put flowers in my hair but I could certainly find bits of myself in each of my BJDs. They are the incarnations of what I love,  admire and even fear. I think I have a rather whimsical and dreamy personality. I am fascinated by many things, I love to be filled with marvel and to make discoveries. I hope that I will stay like this for the rest of my life. I hope that I will find many things that will inspire me and that I will like and will allow me to improve. I cannot conceive of this passion without evolution. I think that I would have gotten bored had it not been such a great source of creativity.

BJDmagazine: Is there anything else that you would like to share with our readers?

Esthy: I would just like to say that if you want to do things that you have never tried to do before, do it! Don’t be afraid of having to try again and again, of searching, of not having the right techniques…because you can learn all of that on your own. Have fun, that’s all that counts!

Esthy ROSA NEBULOSA

You can find Esthy on:

Her Blog: http://esthyswonderland.blogspot.com/

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/esthy_et_lulla/

Etsy: http://www.etsy.com/shop/EsthyLulla

We want to thank Alexandra Dlugy-Hegwer for her translation.
Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.
~BJDmagazine
Esthy ROSA NEBULOSA

Interview avec Esthy, Photographe Française de BJDs (French Version) (3/3)

Dans cette dernière partie de notre interview avec Esthy, Esthy nous parle du choix des noms de ses BJDs, et de ses face-ups.

BJDmagazine: Comment choisissez-vous les noms de vos personnages? Attachez-vous beaucoup d’importance au nom?

Esthy: La plupart du temps je ne choisis un nom que lorsque leur customisation est terminée, afin de coller à l’image qu’elles dégagent.  Je choisi souvent un véritable prénom sauf quelques exceptions. Dans ces cas là c‘est parce que le personnage est totalement identifié par son nom comme par exemple Belladone qui est une empoisonneuse ou Nini P‘tit Cœur qui est une artiste de cirque.
Mes Lati doll  ont toutes des noms de  gâteaux et sucreries car elles sont dans un monde à part des autres, elles ne sont d’ailleurs pas dans la même vitrine.
Poudre ou Chloé (en rapport avec la chanson de Mylène Farmer) sont des poupées avec lesquelles je savais exactement ce que je voulais faire et donc elles ont eu leur nom avant même d’arriver.
Le nom est assez important car il défini plus ou moins le personnage.

Esthy Beautiful monster

BJDmagazine: Vous faites les face-ups pour vos BJDs? Qu’est-ce qui vous guide dans vos choix?

Esthy: Je veux juste donner un visage à ma poupée qui me plaira et qui saura révéler la poupée, qui me la fera aimer ,car souvent la poupée sans visage me parait parfaitement insipide et inintéressante.  J’ai affiné mes goûts et je n’ai cessé de tenter d’avoir le rendu que je désirais avec mes poupées, à travers leurs maquillages. J’aime les visages qui ont du relief et qui sont très blushés.
Je me suis beaucoup améliorée depuis mon tout premier maquillage il y a cinq ans, j’ai écouté et accepté la critique pour évoluer, appris à utiliser des matériaux différents, essayé de nouvelles méthodes afin d’avoir un meilleur rendu et je tente de ne pas me reposer sur mes acquis pour avoir la possibilité de toujours me renouveler, de ne pas faire toujours les même maquillages. J’ai aussi pu compter sur les conseils précieux de certains de mes amis talentueux pour progresser.

Esthy 1920

BJDmagazine:Dans tous vos face-ups, les yeux sont légèrement fardés avec des poudres irisées, les sourcils a peine visibles. Les bouches semblent attirer l’attention, et deviennent responsables de l’émotion. Pourquoi? Quel est votre secret pour des bouches si vivantes?

Esthy: J’ai aussi des poupées où l’accent est mis sur le regard, cela dépend de ce que le moule m’inspire mais il est vrai que j’aime les couleurs pastels, douces, qui peuvent créer un grand contraste avec de grandes cernes par exemple ou une bouche très travaillée. J’aime les BJD qui ont de belles bouches bien dessinées, si elles sont charnues c’est encore mieux. Les plus belles lèvres pour moi ce sont celles des unoa lusis.
Plus la bouche est pleine plus on peut faire de détails et travailler sur les volumes. La touche finale, le gloss est pour moi tout à fait indispensable, la brillance rend la moue, le sourire, l’expression de la poupée plus intense. J’aime les poupées avec de belles bouches et de bonnes joues!

Esthy Laces

BJDmagazine: Vous aimez les tâches de rousseur. Comment les rendez-vous si délicates?

Esthy: J’adore les tâches de rousseurs, ça peut donner tellement de personnalité à certaines poupées! Je les fais à la peinture acrylique très diluée pour garder un effet transparent qui me parait important. Je dilue plus ou moins la peinture selon l’effet désiré. Je tente ensuite de les placer aux endroits qui me semblent les plus opportuns suivant la poupée et l’expression qu’on souhaite lui donner.

BJDmagazine: Quelles sont vos inspirations pour les face-ups?

Esthy: Je pense que comme tout le monde j’ai des artistes en maquillage de BJD préféré, cependant  il ne me semble pas m’inspirer de qui que ce soit bien que je reprenne des techniques utilisées par plusieurs maquilleurs. Je tente juste de faire quelque chose qui me semble plus ou moins réaliste même si le moule de la poupée ne l’est pas du tout. J’aime la transparence des visages et les couleurs douces sur les magnifiques peintures de Mark Ryden mais j’aime aussi la délicatesse des traits des  peintures préraphaélites. J’aime les visages des personnages d’artistes en poupées comme Julien Martinez, Lillycat, Nicole Marschollek ou Anne Mitrani.
J’aime beaucoup de choses mais je tente de toujours être originale et de ne puiser que dans mon imagination même si je sais bien qu’on est toujours influencé par quelqu’un qu’on le veuille ou non.

Esthy Alice and the bunnies

BJDmagazine: Vous faites des face-ups sur commission. Est-ce très différent pour vous de peindre une de vos poupées ou de peindre pour une commission?

Esthy: Cela dépends de ce que l’on me demande de faire. Je n’accepte pas les commissions lorsqu’on me demande quelque chose qui ne ressemble en rien à ce que j’ai l’habitude de faire. Je tente de rediriger les gens vers les artistes qui correspondront le mieux à leurs désirs.
Il faut que je prennes du plaisir, que j’ai envie de faire ce maquillage pour qu’il soit réussit et si il est trop éloigné de mes goûts personnels ce ne sera pas possible.
C’est toujours délicat de maquiller pour une autre personne, surtout si on ne la connais pas personnellement, on ne peut jamais être sur que le résultat va lui plaire et les photos envoyées ne sont pas toujours fidèles au rendu réel. Ma plus grande crainte et de décevoir la personne qui m’a fait confiance.
Mais maquiller les BJD est pour moi un vrai bonheur, j’y prends beaucoup de plaisir. J’aime découvrir de nouveaux moules, et rien n’est plus gratifiant qu’une personne qui est heureuse du maquillage que j’ai fait sur sa BJD.

Esthy Not so wise

BJDmagazine: “Poudre”. Est-ce un peu vous, jouant avec des fleurs, des bijoux, et du maquillage?

Esthy: Poudre est une petite poupée qui est un peu comme une mascotte pour moi, elle incarne ma vision de la féminité. J’aime me maquiller et mettre des fleurs dans mes cheveux mais je pourrais sûrement trouver une part de moi en chacune de mes BJD, elles sont les incarnations de ce que j’aime, ce dont j‘ai peur ou ce que j‘admire.
Je crois que j’ai une personnalité assez fantasque et rêveuse, je suis fascinée par beaucoup de chose, j’aime être émerveillée et faire des découvertes. J’espère que je le resterais toute ma vie et que je trouverais encore un tas de choses qui m’inspireront et me plairont, que je m’améliorerais encore aussi . Je ne peux pas concevoir cette passion sans évolution, je crois que je me serais lassée très vite si ce n‘était pas une aussi grande source de créativité.

BJDmagazine: Y-a-t’il autre chose que vous aimeriez partager avec nos lecteurs?

Esthy: Je dirais juste que si vous avez envie de faire des choses que vous n’avez jamais essayé, lancez-vous!  N’ayez pas peur de devoir recommencer encore et encore, de tâtonner , de ne pas avoir les bonnes techniques… car tout cela vous pouvez le développer vous-même. Éclatez-vous, c’est tout ce qui compte!

Esthy ROSA NEBULOSA

Vous trouverez  Esthy sur:

Blog: http://esthyswonderland.blogspot.com/

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/esthy_et_lulla/

Etsy: http://www.etsy.com/shop/EsthyLulla

Nous remercions Alexandra Dlugy-Hegwer pour sa belle traduction.
Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.
~BJDmagazine
Esthy Poudre

Interview with Esthy, French BJD Photographer (Part 2)

In the second installment of our interview with Esthy, Esthy tells us about where she gets the amazing costumes her BJDs wear, photoshop,  and Tim Burton’s influence on her work.

BJDmagazine: You wrote ‘”when I can’t sleep, I play with Photoshop.” What place does Photoshop hold in your creative process? Do you have any recommendations for our readers?

Esthy: Photoshop has become an indispensable tool for me. I use a lot of elements that come from personal photos and free textures from other Internet users. I use these layers to give a certain dimension and volume to my photographs. Most of all, I like to give them an aged feeling or a painterly quality. They can be more or less heavy, and I often rework them. Then, I play with contrast, colors, and the lighting of the photo. I also really like tools like “finger” or duplication, which  help me perfect my images. Photoshop has changed my way of seeing photos. I keep discovering new possibilities every day. I never look at the tutorials. I feel my way around to obtain the result that flatters the doll the most. I never have a preconceived idea of  what I will do with a photo.

Esthy Little Bo Peep

BJDmagazine: Do you have favorite photographs? Which ones, and why?

Esthy: There are some that exude more intensity than others for me. They show exactly what the doll is in my eyes. I have many favorites, and certain ones definitely stand out from from the rest, like the photos of Poudre, or those of Euphemia and Ophelia, my Belosses from DIM, who give off a very soft feeling. Actually, more than having favorite photos, I have some dolls inspire me more than others.

BJDmagazine: You are a self-taught photographer. What was the most difficult thing for you to master?

Esthy: With automatic cameras, it’s easy to take a really simple pretty photo. The hardest for me was to master a bridge, and after that the digital reflex, and finally to learn how to use Photoshop. Even if I learned it my way, which is certainly different from the “academic” way of doing things, I always find it much more fun to discover things myself.

BJDmagazine: As an artist, what is the goal of your photographs?

Esthy: I’ve never really thought about it. I think that, beyond the aesthetic aspect and beauty of the doll,  I want to make those who see my photographs enter a different universe. I want them to enter my world. I am happy when people are able to decipher a photo and see in it exactly what I see, but all interpretations are interesting, and they often show me facets that I would not have thought of.

Esthy Little ghosts in laces

BJDmagazine: Your BJDs have magnificent costumes. Do you make them yourself? Or do you have favorite sources?

Esthy: Unfortunately, I am a poor seamstress. It’s not that I didn’t try, but I think that sewing is really not for me. So I leave it to those who have talent in this domain, and there are some who really have a fairy’s touch! I have all sorts of outfits, but they are always in a vintage style. For 26 centimeter BJDs and Lati yellow, I love the Rosenlied brand, which sells little garments made by several talented seamstresses. I also like certain outfits by the Japanese companies, Volks and Musedoll. Then there are the seamstresses like Silent Dolls (Princesse Lola), La Pierlé, Arcadia, Candy House, Edhelwen and her brand “Affreusement mignon”, Shazdolls, and others for which I have a particular that do a particularly beautiful job, original and immaculate. And lastly, I antique-hunt, I have old doll clothes that I can modify for certain BJDs.

BJDmagazine: Your BJDs have wonderful wigs. Do you have any recommendations for our readers on wigs, and how to style them? Do you make the wigs yourself, or do you have preferred sources?

Esthy: I don’t make the wigs for my dolls myself, although I love to modify them at my convenience. My favorite wigs come from Leeke World; both the mohair and the synthetic fibers are of excellent quality and are often styled in very original ways. I love to sew flowers on fabric or paper, ribbons and pearls, or little jewels in my dolls’ wigs. I often recut the wigs, because I love it when my BJDs have their foreheads well exposed.

Esthy Naughty pixie!

BJDmagazine: How do you develop a character for each doll? Is it clear from the start or does it go through an experimental phase?

Esthy: It’s pretty rare that I know exactly what I want to do with a new BJD before starting her makeup. I see the potential of the sculpt which makes me buy it and then the personality does not materialize until after the makeup, the wig, the eyes, and the clothing. Only at this moment, does she reveal herself to me and I give her a name. Sometimes I will run simulations based on a photo of the sculpt thanks to Photoshop, which gives me ideas on what I could like. This is never really final and most of the time I change the idea during the face-up. The choice of clothing only comes at the end, to perfect the character. Once she is complete, it is rare for me to change her style. I might replace her wig, or redo her face-up, but the overall feel must still be the same or else the BJD will change name and thus character.

BJDmagazine: The spirit of your collections is very “Tim Burton”, or very “Interview with a Vampire”. Do you see them as such? Are there other dimensions?

Esthy: I’ve been a fan of Tim Burton since I was 9 years old when I first saw “Beetlejuice”. There was something there that touched me profoundly:  aesthetics, a sense of humor, a vision of life and death that fascinated me right away. Blackberry, my Volks Suiseiseki is a sort of homage to Tim Burton, she incorporates some of the details from my favorite films. “Interview with a Vampire” or Coppola’s “Dracula” are films that brought out and sharpened my sense of aesthetics.  I like fantasy in film and literature, universes inhabited by extraordinary beings, monsters, and fairies.  I also like films in period costumes. The aesthetics and the fashion of the Victorian era, the roaring 20’s and the 50’s are what inspire me the most!

Esthy Colors

Join us Saturday, 9 am, Boston Time for the third and last installment of our interview with Esthy.

You can find Esthy on:

Her Blog: http://esthyswonderland.blogspot.com/

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/esthy_et_lulla/

Her Etsy: http://www.etsy.com/shop/EsthyLulla

We want to give a special thank you to Alexandra Dlugy-Hegwer for her beautiful translation.
Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.
~BJDmagazine
Esthy Poudre

Interview avec Esthy, Photographe Française de BJDs (French Version) (2/3)

Dans la seconde partie de notre interview avec Esthy, Esthy nous parle de photoshop, des superbes costumes de ses BJDs, et de l’influence de Tim Burton sur ses créations.

BJDmagazine: Vous avez écrit ” quand je ne peux pas dormir, je joue avec photoshop. ” Quelle est la place de photoshop dans processus créatif? Avez-vous des recommandations pour nos lecteurs?

Esthy: Photoshop est devenu pour moi un outil indispensable. J’utilise beaucoup de calques qui sont soit des photos personnelles soit des textures données gratuitement par les internautes. Ces calques me servent à donner une dimension à mes photos, du volume. J‘aime par-dessus tout leur donner un aspect vieillit ou de peinture. Ils peuvent être plus ou moins lourds et je les retravaille très souvent. Puis je joue sur les contrastes, les couleurs et l’éclairage de la photo. J’aime aussi beaucoup utiliser des outil comme le « doigt » ou  la duplication qui aident à parfaire mon image.
Photoshop a changé ma façon de voir la photo, du moment où je l’ai eu je n’ai cessé de découvrir de nouvelles possibilités. Je ne regarde jamais les tutoriaux, je tâtonnes et cherche par moi-même afin d’obtenir le résultat qui mettra le plus en valeur la poupée. Je n’ai jamais d’idée préconçue sur ce que je vais faire de la photo.

Esthy Little Bo Peep

BJDmagazine: Avez-vous des photos préférées, lesquelles, et pourquoi?

Esthy: Il y en a certaines qui dégagent plus d’intensité que d’autres pour moi, qui montre tout à fait ce qu’est la poupée à mes yeux. J’ai beaucoup de favorites mais ils y en a certaines qui se détachent nettement du lot, comme les photos de Poudre, ou celles d’Euphemia et Ophelia, mes Belosses de chez DIM, qui dégagent un sentiment très doux. En fait, je crois que plus qu’une photo favorites j’ai des poupées qui m‘inspirent plus que d’autres.

BJDmagazine: Vous êtes une photographe autodidacte. Quelle a été pour vous la chose la plus difficile à maîtriser?

Esthy: Avec les appareils potos automatiques c’est facile de faire une jolie photo toute simple. Le plus dur a été pour moi d’apprivoiser un bridge puis ensuite le reflex numérique et enfin d’apprendre à utiliser Photoshop, même si c’est à ma manière qui est sûrement très loin de la façon « académique » de faire mais j’ai toujours trouvé plus amusant de faire mes propres découvertes.

BJDmagazine:  En tant qu’artiste, quel est le but de vos photos?

Esthy: Je n’y avais jamais vraiment réfléchis. Je crois qu’au-delà de l’aspect esthétique et de la beauté de la poupée je veux faire entrer ceux qui regardent mes photos dans un univers différent, dans mon monde. Je suis heureuse quand les gens arrivent à décrypter une photo et y voient exactement ce que moi j’y vois, mais toutes les interprétations sont intéressantes et souvent me montrent des facettes que je n’aurais pas soupçonnées.

Esthy Little ghosts in laces

BJDmagazine: Vos BJDs ont des costumes magnifiques. Les faites-vous vous-même? Ou avez-vous des sources préférées?

Esthy: Malheureusement je suis une piètre couturière, ce n’est pas faute d’avoir essayé mais je crois que la couture n’est vraiment pas pour moi alors je laisse ça à celles et ceux qui ont du talent dans ce domaine et il y en a qui ont de vrais doigts de fée! J’ai toutes sortes de tenues mais toujours dans un style ancien. Pour les BJD de taille 26 centimètres et Lati yellow j’adore la marque Rosenlied qui vend des petits vêtements faits par plusieurs couturières de talent. J’aime aussi certaines tenues de la maison japonaise Volks et de Musedoll. Ensuite il y a les couturières comme Silent Dolls (Princesse Lola), La Pierlé, Arcadia, Candy House,  Edhelwen et sa marque « Affreusement mignon », Shazdolls et bien d’autres  que j’affectionne beaucoup et qui font un travail particulièrement beau, original et soigné! Puis en dernier lieu je chine, j’ai des vêtements de poupées anciennes qui peuvent convenir à certaines BJD.

BJDmagazine:  Vos BJDs ont des wig formidables. Avez-vous des recommandations pour nos lecteurs sur les wigs, et comment les styliser? Faites-vous les wigs vous-même, ou avez-vous des sources préférées?

Esthy: Je ne fais pas les wigs de mes poupées moi-même cependant j’adore les modifier à ma convenance. Mes wigs favorites viennent de chez Leeke World autant celles en mohair que celles en fibre synthétiques, elles sont d’excellente qualité et sont souvent stylisées de façon très originale.
J’adore coudre des fleurs en tissus ou papier, des rubans et des perles ou des petits bijoux dans les perruques de mes poupées, souvent je les recoupe car j’aime beaucoup quand mes BJD ont le front bien dégagé.

Esthy Naughty pixie!

BJDmagazine: Comment développez-vous un personnage pour chaque poupée? Est-ce clair dès le début,ou cette création prend-elle des détours?

Esthy: Il est assez rare que je sache exactement ce que je souhaite faire d’une nouvelle BJD avant de commencer son maquillage. Je vois le potentiel du moule ce qui fait que je l’achète puis le personnage n’arrive qu’après le maquillage, la perruque, les yeux et les vêtements. A ce moment là seulement elle se révèle à moi et je lui donne son nom.
Parfois il m’arrive de faire des simulations à  partir d’une photo du moule nu grâce à photoshop ce qui me donne des idées sur ce que je pourrais aimer. Mais ce n’est jamais très concluant et la plupart du temps je change d’idée durant le maquillage. Le choix des vêtements ne viens qu’à la fin pour parfaire le personnage. Lorsqu’elle est complète il est rare par la suite que je change son style, je pourrais remplacer sa perruque ou refaire son maquillage mais l’ensemble devra toujours dégager la même chose ou alors la BJD changera de nom et donc de personnalité.

BJDmagazine: L’esprit de vos collections est très “ Tim Burton“, ou très “Entretien avec un Vampire“. Les voyez-vous comme telles? Y-a-t’il d’autres dimensions?

Esthy:Je suis une fan de Tim Burton depuis mes neuf ans lorsque j’ai vu pour la première fois le film « Beetlejuice », il y avait là quelque chose qui m’a profondément touché. Une esthétique, un humour, une vision de la vie et de la mort qui m’a tout de suite fasciné. Blackberry, ma Volks Suiseiseki est une sorte d’hommage à Tim Burton, elle reprend des détails de certains de mes films favoris.
« Entretien avec un vampire » ou « Dracula » de Coppola sont des films qui ont éveillé et aiguisé mon sens esthétique.  J’aime les films et la littérature fantastique, des univers peuplés d’êtres extraordinaires, de monstres et de fées.
J’aime aussi les films en costumes d’époque. L’esthétique et la mode de l’époque victorienne, des années folles et des années 50 sont celles qui m’inspirent le plus!

Esthy Colors

Joignez-vous  à nous Samedi, 9 heures du matin, heure de Boston,  pour la troisième et dernière partie de notre interview avec Esthy.

Vous trouverez  Esthy sur:

Blog: http://esthyswonderland.blogspot.com/

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/esthy_et_lulla/

Etsy: http://www.etsy.com/shop/EsthyLulla

Nous remercions Alexandra Dlugy-Hegwer pour sa belle traduction.
Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.
~BJDmagazine