Category Archives: Tutorial

Tutorials with instructions and photographs that show you how to create items for your BJD

Fairyland BJD Minifee Shushu

Where to start with BJDs? by Lea Mars (Part 1)

So you just saw a pretty picture of a ball-jointed doll somewhere on the Internet, and decided: ‘Hey! I want one too!’ You google “BJD”, but there is so much information that you quickly give up. Fear no more! In this article I will try to lay down the basics of BJDs, and what you can do with them!

First off, you might see the term “ABJD”, which stands for Asian Ball Jointed Doll. This is because these dolls were typically made in Korea and Japan. More recently, BJDs have started being produced in China, Australia, the US, and Europe. The term BJDs recognizes this geographic diversity.

Most BJDs are manufactured in urethane resin. There are other types of ball-jointed dolls. In particular, some doll artists create original BJDs in porcelain or cellulose-based clay. This article will focus on resin BJDs manufactured by companies.

What makes ball-jointed dolls special is that they are both poseable and customizable.

A BJD’s joints let you pose them in very lifelike ways. The location and number of joints varies by manufacturer. They usually have joints in the elbows, knees, feet, hands, and sometimes the torso. Their heads also sit on a ball so you can also move the head around.

Often, BJD owners customize their dolls to create a unique and original character. Many people start by purchasing a ‘nude doll’ and then customize the eyes, the hair, the makeup, and costumes progressively to create a doll like the one they dream of.

Fairyland BJD MiniFee Shushu

Before you get into the hobby, I want to warn you: BJDs are an expensive hobby! Not to discourage you, but don’t just buy the first BJD you see. Give it some time. Wait and see if you still like that doll after 2 or 3 months…maybe longer! This way, you will avoid buying a doll and then finding out that this hobby isn’t for you. This may sound a bit grim, but it’s essential for enjoying this hobby to its fullest! And it is an amazing hobby.

Be sure to look around and visit a variety of BJD forums to find the one that’s right for you. There are a lot of amazing forums out there that vary by size, language, and focus. Den of Angels is the largest and best known English-language forum. Other forums serve a particular region or country. Some focus on a particular category of BJDs.

BJDs come in different sizes, from as tiny as 10cm, to as big as 90cm! There are also life-sized BJD’s (shotakotake on DA) and 5cm tall BJD’s (DreamHigh studio). The most common names for sizes are SD (Super Dollfie), MSD (Mini Super Dollfie), YoSD, and Tinies.

SD’s are usually around 60 cm (24inch) tall. MSD’s are about 40cm (16 inches) tall. YoSDs are about 25 cm tall. And the Tinies are everything smaller than 12 cm. And there are many dolls in between these sizes.

Every size has positive and negative aspects. SD’s are usually the most poseable, have the most detailed features, but they are also more expensive, the heaviest, and the least transportable. While some tinies lack posability, they are easy to carry around and are more affordable. Though their features are less detailed, they are irresistibly cute. Some tinies are known for being more poseable than others, such as pukipukis from FairyLand.

Fairyland BJD Minifee Shushu

After deciding which size is best for you, it’s time to look at the different manufactures that offer BJDs in the size you’ve chosen! There are hundreds of companies that sell BJDs. I will provide a partial list of companies at the end of this article. You can order the doll directly from the manufacturers, or you can purchase one from a retailer located in your country, such as Denver Doll Emporium in the United States. Most commonly, when you purchase a doll, the doll is not manufactured until after your payment is received. The average wait for the delivery of the doll is two to three months. Some retailers may carry some dolls in stock.

You can also purchase pre-owned dolls. Most forums have a section called “Marketplace” where members in good standing can list their dolls for sale. The prices are often close to the original prices, as these dolls keep their values, but you will have the doll in your hands sooner this way. Pre-owned BJDs are also offered on eBay from time to time.

One last word of advice: Don’t just look at the companies’ pictures. If you find a BJD you like, look it up on DoA and in the other forums. This will give you a better idea of what your doll could look like with different customizations. These pictures are also a great inspiration for you to consider while you think about the choices that will let you create a unique and original BJD.

Fairyland BJD Minifee Shushu

Text: (c) 2011, Lea Mars

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Tutorial: Creating a BJD Head and Face with Linda Macario

In this tutorial, Linda Macario, the Italian BJD doll-maker, shows us how to sculpt a BJD head and apply a face-up.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Click any image to see it in full size.

Materials

  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Box cutter
  • Fine sand paper
  • Sculpting tools
  • Paint Brushes (Larger for coating, 00 for fine lines)
  • Makeup sponge
  • Polystyrene
  • LaDoll or DAS (air-drying paper clay)
  • Modeling paste (e.g., by LaDoll)
  • Chalk powder (or chalk sticks which you can grind into a powder)
  • Acrylic paints
  • Glass eyes
  • Thick wire (stiff enough to hold its shape under elastic tension)
  • Eye protection, protective gloves.
  • Dremmel tool with spherical grinding attachment (see picture in tutorial)

Draw the face and Create the Core

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Draw the front and side view of doll’s head in full scale (1:1).

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

On a separate sheet of paper, draw outlines of the front and side views, but 5mm smaller than the original drawings. Then cut them out.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Cut a cube of polystyrene and trace the head shapes on it. Then cut the excess polystyrene and refine the block to obtain the head core.

Sculpt the Face

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Cover the polystyrene core with a layer of Ladoll clay (5mm thick). Let the covered core dry. Once dry, draw a center vertical line and a horizontal eye line.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Sketch the facial features on the head, following the original design.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add clay for the eyes, eyebrows, nose, mouth and cheeks.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Remember to look at your head from all view points while you are sculpting. It’s very important for the final result.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add details to the face, shaping the eyes, nostrils and lips. The eyeballs are recessed relative to the eyelids.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Sculpt the eyelids and refine the nose and mouth.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Model all particulars with care, preserving balance and proportions.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add clay where you need it (here I’ve added some to the forehead.) Remove any excess. Let the clay dry.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Draw the ears in the correct position on the dry clay. The ears should be positioned between the corner of the eye and the corner of the mouth.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Create a small ear with clay.

sLinda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Wet the clay on the head where the ear will go. Then place the ear on the head.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add the external ear fold.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add the inner ear fold, like a small letter C. Then create the deepest points by pushing them in with a sculpting tool. The ear is done. (Making ears requires a lot of practice. Don’t get discouraged if it’s not good on the first try.)

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Repeat for the other ear. Be sure to position the ears at the same height.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Once again, inspect the head from different angles and check details. Let the head dry fully.

Create the Eye Openings

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Trace a line around the top of the head, right behind the ears. Draw an arrow at the top center point of the head.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Cut the head along the line.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Make holes through the center of the eyes. When you look inside the head, you can see the location of the eyes.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Follow the safety precautions for using the Dremel, such as wearing eye-protection and protective gloves.

Using the Dremel inside the head, carefully grind out the eye sockets.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

These are the eye sockets.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Flatten two similar balls of clay and squeeze them into the eye sockets. Then press in the eyes into the clay.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

From the front, use a sculpting tool to remove the excess clay. Then position the eyes as you want them.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Here is the face after the eyes have been positioned.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Secure the eyes in place by adding  some clay over the eyes inside the head.

Create the Head Articulation

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Cut a round hole where the head connects to the neck.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add some clay to the hole.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Gently press the neck ball into the clay to create the head joint socket.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Rejoin the front and back of the head with some clay. Then let it air-dry completely.

Coat the Head

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

With fine sand paper, smooth the head. Then wipe the surface with a damp cloth.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Mix the colored paints and add some water to obtain a skin tone coating.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add modeling paste and chalk base to get the coating to a creamy consistency.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Paint the head with 4 layers of coating.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Clean the eyes. Your head is ready to paint.

Create the Elastic Hook

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Create a hole for the elastic bands in the head joint socket.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Make two holes and a groove on the top center of the head.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Create a hook with a wire.

Insert the hook through the head joint socket so it comes out the front hole.

sLinda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Bend the long part of the hook  so it sits in the groove and goes back down the other hole.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Adjust the bends so you can still see the hook like this.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Cover with a little clay.

Paint the Head

sLinda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Prepare a certain color to paint the head.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Use very diluted acrylic paints and apply them to the makeup sponge.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Apply a light coat of paint to the circled areas. (Do not draw these lines on the face.)

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

With a pencil, draw two lines for the eyebrows.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add color to the lips.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

With a 00 brush, paint the eyelashes, eyebrows, and fine lines on the lips.

stLinda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

MiyukiDollfie BJD Wigs

Interview With a BJD Wig-Maker – MiyukiDollfie (Part 1)

MiyukiDollfie (Veronica Degli Esposti) tells us how she came to love making BJD wigs and shares some tips for doing it yourself.

BJDmagazine: You have a large collection of BJDs. How did you get into the hobby?

Veronica: Yes, it’s true, and sometimes I realize that I’ve lost count. Above all, the Lati Yellow and similar sizes are my favorites and I will never stop buying them. I find them very nice, and they give me free reign with the fantasy and the combination of clothing and wigs.
In fact, my collection started nearly 5 years ago in a slightly strange way, and not with the much loved small sizes…which, quite to the contrary, I quite frankly snubbed at first. I always collected dolls, especially Barbie, but it had been about 2 to 3 years that I hadn’t had any interest and had not bought them. Then, one day, my sister Daniela (aka Fairy_Dany) came to my house all happy talking to me about this magnificent doll she had bought on eBay. He was a Hound, a beautiful, tall, 70 cm boy. And what can I say… it was love at first sight! So I started to search for my first BJD. At that time it was an easy choice because there weren’t as many dolls manufacturers as there are today: Luts, Volks, DoD, Lati, and a few others. So, one day I found Luts Delf Miyu and since then, we’ve never left each other.

MiyukiDollfie BJD Wigs

BJDmagazine: When did you start making wigs and why?

Veronica: I started making wigs right after I bought my first MSD, and because Tsubasa, my Lati Blue Shaina, didn’t look good with any of the wigs I bought for her. Often the wigs where too big or too tight for her head. So, one day, I had a chance to try an SD fur wig. Seeing how well it suited her, I decided to find one in her size. It was because of this that I discovered the existence of a material called Tibetan lambskin fur. It looked so good in my photographs of her, that commissions started to arrive after I displayed them.

Getting started creating a pattern from scratch was not easy. It helped to think about my granny, who was a very smart and creative person. For her, with enough commitment and a bit of imagination, anyone could create something from nothing. I am grateful to her for her encouraging words, and for teaching me things when I was a child, especially using the sewing machine! Special thanks also go to my boyfriend, who helped me develop the initial SD wig patterns. Today, I have three different patterns to accommodate various doll sizes.

MiyukiDollfie BJD Wigs

BJDmagazine: You say making wigs is a fun hobby. Why do you love it so much?

Veronica: Basically it stimulates my creativity. When I’m tired and stressed from everyday life, you have no idea how rewarding and happy it makes me to create something that is all mine…that is the fruit of my imagination. When I make wigs from the unique ideas of customers and friends, it’s even more fun! Friends often make me a little drawing of their ideas and what they want, and creating and giving life to that little piece of paper is beautiful. Then, when I complete my hard work, I feel satisfied because the result is really appreciated by those who commissioned it, and more so because I succeeded in creating something that did not exist before. :-)

BJDmagazine: What kind of materials do you use to make your wigs?

Veronica: Mostly Tibetan Lamk Skin fur and synthetic fur, even though I’ve started creating wool wigs. I am currently working on a fur wig with felted wool to give the impression of dreadlocks.

MiyukiDollfie BJD Wigs

BJDmagazine: How different is a Tibetan Lambskin fur wig from a synthetic fur wig?

Veronica: The most substantial difference is about fiber. Tibetan fur is a natural fiber, soft and very similar to human hair. You can straighten it or curl it and it has a very natural feel. “Synthetic Fur”, by contrast, is a synthetic fiber, is not as soft to the touch, and appears more synthetic and shiny. Personally, I appreciate both because on male BJDs fur looks more masculine than mohair.

MiyukiDollfie BJD Wigs

BJDmagazine:  Do you dye the wigs yourself? Do you use natural dyes or chemical dyes?

Veronica: Yes, I dye the wigs myself. The only dyes that work are chemical. This is because Tibetan fur contains lanolin, a sort of oil that prevents natural color dyes from adhering completely and creating uniform colors. Dying is really fun because it allows me to obtain colors and mixes that I had not been able to obtain before. But it’s also a very long and hard process because you need to pay attention so as not to ruin the skin. In fact, if you mess up the dyeing, the skin can become tighter, or thicker, or, when you sew, the skin can break or flake.

MiyukiDollfie BJD Wigs

BJDmagazine: What is a Tibetan fur wig, really? Where do you get the fur?

Veronica: Mohair is a natural fiber obtained from Tibetan sheep. It is composed of a skin with naturally attached hair. (The hair is not sewn in.) In the beginning, I bought some abroad because it was a little less expensive. But now, with the new restrictions on importing furs in Europe, I prefer to buy from specialized stores in Italy.

BJDmagazine: What natural colors does the Tibetan fur come in? Is the it always curly or are there variations?Are there variations in the length of the fibers?

Veronica: Basically it’s possible to find Tibetan Fur in ivory white (brilliant white isn’t natural, because it comes from whitened ivory mohair), black, some kind of blonde and brown. Normally it is curly, but it can have straighter or curlier parts only at the ends or at the roots. It is possible to find it in different lengths of fiber too, from 5 to 15 cm, and with different types of skin too. Sometimes the skin can be too thick and is not good for sewing. The fiber is almost always fine but extremely strong. One last thing is that not all Tibetan fur  plates are good to create a wig, because they can have scars on the skin, sewn areas or parts with irregular fiber lengths (from very long to very short.)

MiyukiDollfie BJD Wigs

BJDmagazine: How do you style a Tibetan fur wig? How do you give the wig a hair cut?

Veronica: To tell the truth, I have my hairdressers to thank. They taught me to cut my wigs’ hair following little tips that they use daily. When I have to create a hairstyle, I use water or I use hair gel (with water) to revitalize the hair. The most difficult thing is straightening the fur. Because the fibers are curled, even if I use a hair dryer on every lock of hair, it takes 30 to 40 minutes.

BJDmagazine: How do you care for a Tibetan fur wig?

Veronica: Tibetan fur wigs can be washed with a bit of shampoo or natural soap under lukewarm water. The important thing is not to wet the skin because it could shrink. If the skin gets wet, try to dry it immediately. Open it and fill it with tons of handkerchiefs. Create a ball as big as the doll’s head and put it into the wig, so the skin won’t become smaller, and handkerchiefs will absorb the skin’s humidity.

MiyukiDollfie BJD Wigs

Join us on Saturday January 15th ( at 8 a.m. Boston time) for the second part of MiyukiDollfie’s Interview.

You can find MiyukiDollfie on:

Her Blog: http://miyukidollfie.blogspot.com/

Flick: http://www.flickr.com/photos/miyukidollfie/

Please help us by linkingtweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.
~BJDmagazine
Miyuki Dollfie Tiny BJD Wig Tutorial

Tutorial: MiyukiDollfie’s Tiny BJD Fur Wig

This easy wig pattern is designed for FairyLand pukipuki and other similarly sized BJDs (Lati White, Brownie). The fur material is elastic, which means it fits the doll perfectly! The wig can be hand-sewn or machine-sewn.

MiyukiDollfie Tiny BJD Wig Tutorial

Materials

  • Piece of fur 5 inches by 5 inches
  • Sewing thread
  • Sewing needle and/or a sewing machine
  • Pencil or a tailor’s chalk
  • Tape measure
  • Scissors

MiyukiDollfie Tiny BJD Wig Tutorial

Create the pattern

MiyukiDollfie tiny BJD Wig Tutorial

Measure the circumference of the tiny BJD’s head . (The circumference is usually around 9,5 cm or 3 3/4 inch) and add 0,5 cm (1/4 inch).

MiyukiDollfie Tiny BJD Wig Tutorial

On the fur, draw a rectangle  with length (circumference+ 0.5cm) and width 4 cm (1 1/2 inch).
Cut from right to left and take care  not to cut the fur hair near the scissors. You should try to cut only the fabric backing of the fur piece.

Sew the wig

MiyukiDollfie Tiny BJD Wig Tutorial

On the furry edge, roll the fabric backing over on itself, and then whip stitch it.

MiyukiDollfie Tiny BJD Wig Tutorial

Fold the band over, so the backing is on the outside and the fur on the inside. Sew the ends together using a sewing machine, or hand-sew using a whip stitch.
MiyukiDollfie Tiny BJD Wig Tutorial

Place the sewing machine foot, or you sewing needle, half-way down the folded edge.

MiyukiDollfie Tiny BJD Wig Tutorial

Sew a semicircle.

MiyukiDollfie Tiny BJD Wig Tutorial

Trim around the semicircle without cutting the folded edge.
Turn the wig right side up.Your wig is ready for your baby to wear!!!

MiyukiDollfie Tiny BJD Wig Tutorial

You can find MiyukiDollfie on:

Her Blog: http://miyukidollfie.blogspot.com/

Flick: http://www.flickr.com/photos/miyukidollfie/

Please help us by linkingtweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.
~BJDmagazine
Fur-collared Winter Jacket Tutorial

Tutorial: Keep Your BJD Warm with This Fur-Collared Winter Jacket

Even with a surprise blizzard, you can keep your BJD warm by creating this fur-collared winter jacket. The pattern fits any ball-jointed doll size – just plug in your BJD’s measurements. This is a quick and easy project with few required materials. The jacket can be sewn by hand or by machine.  Our FairyLand Minifee Shushu, Isabelle, is modeling the jacket.

winter jacket tutorial 2

Materials

  • 1/4 yard felt
  • Sewing thread in matching color
  • Piece of fur, or faux-fur, long enough to go around neck opening
  • 2 beads
  • 2 snap closures
  • Sewing needle, or sewing machine
  • Magna-Tac or clear craft glue
  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Tape measure
  • Scissors

Measure Your BJD

winter jacket tutorial 3

Measure from wrist to wrist. (wtw)

winter jacket tutorial 4

Measure from collar bones to hips. (cth)

winter jacket tutorial 16

Measure from wrist to half way between elbow and shoulder. (wts)

winter jacket tutorial 17

Measure hand at widest. (h)

winter jacket tutorial 18

Measure from collar bone to right above chest. (ctc) For example, the 1-inch mark in this image.

winter jacket tutorial31

Measure from one side of neck to the other. (neck)

Make the Back Pattern

winter jacket tutorial 20

Draw a rectangle using the wtw and cth measurements.

winter jacket tutorial 21

To get the width of the sleeve, divide the h measurement by 2, then add 1/2 inch. Draw a vertical line at each end of wtw with that measurement. Draw line parallel to wtw using the wts measurement. Draw parallel lines to cth. Cut.

winter jacket tutorial 22

Center neck measurement on back piece, and draw a gentle curve 1/4 inch deep.

winter jacket tutorial 23

Cut the neck opening. This is the pattern for the back piece.

Make the Front Pattern

winter jacket tutorial 24

Draw a rectangle using 1/2 of wtw measurement and cth measurement.

winter jacket tutorial 25

To get the width of the sleeve, divide the h measurement by 2, then add 1/2 inch. Draw a vertical line at the end of wtw with that measurement. Draw line parallel to wtw using the wts measurement. Draw a parallel line to cth. Cut.

winter jacket tutorial 26

Using 1/2 of neck measurement, place a tick mark on wtw line. Using ctc measurement, place a tick mark on cth.

winter jacket tutorial 27

Join the 2 tick marks. Cut neck opening. Make a duplicate of this pattern.

Cut the Pieces

winter jacket tutorial 8

Pin the pattern pieces to the felt.

winter jacket tutorial 5

Cut the pattern pieces out.

Sew the Jacket

winter jacket tutorial 30

Pin the pieces together.

winter jacket tutorial 9

Sew shoulder seams, stopping at neck opening.

winter jacket tutorial 10

Sew body and underarm seams.

winter jacket tutorial 11

To allow the underarm to lie flat, make a central incision at the underarm corner.

winter jacket tutorial 12

Then make two incisions, one on each side of that central incision.

Repeat for other arm.

winter jacket tutorial 13

Turn jacket right side out.

winter jacket tutorial 14

Place a line of glue around collar, and glue fur in place.

winter jacket tutorial 15

Glue 2 buttons in the upper part of jacket.

Sew 2 snap closures to keep the top of the jacket closed.

winter jacket tutorial 1

If you like this tutorial, please link to it and share it with your friends!
~BJDmagazine
Fanciful Delights BJD Flapper Hat Tutorial

Fanciful Delights’ BJD Flapper Hat Tutorial

Making this flapper style hat for your BJD is as easy as 1-2-3! There are only three pieces to sew together, either by hand or with a sewing machine. This tutorial shows how to create the body of the hat. Decorating the hat is left to your imagination!

This tutorial shows the project being hand-sewn. I find hand-sewing much more relaxing. It’s not about how fast I can make a hat, but how much I enjoy the process. And really, sewing the body of the hat takes no more than 15 minutes! I like to use embroidery floss to do the sewing because it’s nice and sturdy. If you prefer using a sewing machine with regular thread, that is fine too.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Materials

  • One 9″ x 12” piece of felt
  • Embroidery floss (use 3 strands) or sewing thread in a matching color
  • Sewing needle
  • Trims, beads, ribbons, feathers, etc…
  • Tape measure
  • Pencil
  • Paper
  • Compass or ruler

Create the pattern

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Measure the circumference of the ball-jointed doll’s head. (e.g., 8 inches)

Divide the circumference by 6.28. (e.g., 8 / 6.28 = 1.3)  The result of the division equals the radius “r” of the circle that will form the top of the hat.

Using a compass, draw a circle with a radius “r”. (e.g., 1.3 inches)

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

(Note: If you don’t have a compass, you can draw lines the length of “r” radiating out from a center point, and then draw a circle by hand from point to point.)

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Draw another circle around the first circle. To make a narrow brim, draw the second circle close to the first one. To make it wider, draw the circle farther out.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Measure your BJD’s forehead, from the eyebrows to just above the top of the forehead. This is going to be the depth of the doll’s hat.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Draw a rectangular piece whose length is the circumference of the head (e.g., 8 inches), and whose width is the depth of the forehead.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Cut the pattern pieces out. First, cut along the outer circle. Then cut out the inner circle. Then cut the band. You will end up with a doughnut and a band.

Cut the Felt Pieces

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Pin the pattern pieces to the felt.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Cut the pieces out.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Fold the circular piece over in half. Make a little cut along the inner circle. Then open the piece again, and cut the central circle out.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

You will have a doughnut, a circle, and a band.

Sew the Hat

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Fold the band over, and sew the ends together using a whip stitch.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

With the band still inside out (seam is still sticking out), sew the circle to the top of the band.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

The top of the hat is complete.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Turn the hat upside down, with the top of the hat resting on the table.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Place brim on the hat.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Sew the brim on.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Trim any thread ends.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Turn the hat right side out.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

Fold the front of the hat brim up, and sew it to the body of the hat.

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

This is the completed body of the hat. Now, have fun adding trims, beads, ribbons, and feathers…!

Fanciful Delights BJD Hat Tutorial

You will find Jessica on:

Etsy: http://www.etsy.com/shop/roweena23

She is Roweena23 on Den of Angels

If you like this tutorial, please link to it and share it with your friends!
~BJDmagazine
FairyLand miniFee Shushu Isabelle modeling the Vintage Charm Headpiece

Vintage charm: a BJD floral headdress tutorial

This tutorial shows how to create a floral headdress with vintage charm for your ball-jointed doll. To produce an antiqued look, we dye the simple materials in coffee. Your base materials can have a variety of tones at the outset – the dyeing process will unify those tones with gentle variations. Putting this headdress together is a quick easy project that only requires basic sewing skills.

You can click the images to see larger versions of them.

FairyLand miniFee Shushu modeling for headpeice tutorial

Materials

  • 1/2 yard/meter ribbon, 1/4″ to 3/4″ wide, depending on the size of the doll. (We used 1/2 inch silk dupioni ribbon)
  • 1 downy feather (duck or goose)
  • 6 four-petaled artificial flowers (We used a sprig of artificial hydrangea)
  • 3 color-coordinated bead pearls.
  • Scissors
  • Matching sewing thread
  • Instant coffee (3 to 5 tablespoons depending on the depth of color desired)
  • Saucepan

Dye the Materials

Materials for the BJD magazine headpiece tutorial

Gather your materials. (flowers, ribbon, feather)

Ad coffee to water in a saucepan for ball-jointed doll headpeice

Pour 3 to 5 tablespoons instant coffee in the saucepan with water.

Ad materials to water and heat

Put your materials in the bath.

BJD magazine tutorial

Cook on medium heat for 30 minutes. To achieve a deeper tone, let the material sit in the bath for a few hours after turning off the flame.

Rinse THOROUGHLY. When you’re done, the water should be absolutely clear, with no trace of coffee.

Lay flat to dry.

Put the Materials Together

tutorial for BJD magazine

Select thread and pearl beads that match the color of your materials.

tutorial for ball-jointed doll headpiece

Trim off the flat end of the feather, keeping the downy base.

tutorial for BJD headpiece

Lay the feather on the ribbon.

tutorial for BJD headpiece

Sewing, bind the rachis (spine) of the feather to the ribbon.

tutorial for BJD headpiece

Using scissors, remove the quill (pointy base) of the feather.

tutorial for BJD headpiece

Stack two flowers and align the petals.

tutorial for BJD headpiece

Fold the stacked flowers so the petals are aligned.

tutorial for ABJD headpiece

And fold again, so the petals are aligned.

tutorial for ABJD headpiece

As you complete each set of folded petals, place it over the center of the feather, and sew it to the ribbon (through the feather).

Repeat this for each set of petals (3 sets), arranging them in a three-leaf clover pattern.

tutorial for ABJD headpiece

Sew 3 beads, one at a time, to the center of the “flower”.

tutorial for ABJD headpiece

Place the headdress on the dolls head and tie a bow at the base of the neck.

Trim any downy barbs that are too long. Separate any downy barbs that are too dense. Trim excess ribbon.

FairyLand miniFee Shushu Isabelle modeling headpiece

Fully Fashioned Stockings

Easy-to-make fully fashioned socks/stockings for your BJD

Dear Readers,

For a lot of us, winter has come, and so has the time for socks and stockings. I have created a simple tutorial for you to make your own. Just pick fun, colorful, stretchy fabrics, and with my simple directions,  soon enough you will have a collection of wonderful socks and stockings to match your BJD’s every outfit!

~Wednesday

PS: Click any photograph to see it in full size and play a slideshow.

Materials

Materials

  • Ruler
  • Pencil (not pen)
  • Paper
  • Doll
  • Pins
  • Sewing needles or sewing machine
  • Prewashed t-shirt, knit fabric, or stocking material (8×8 to make stockings, 8×4 to make socks)
  • Thread (color matches fabric)

Create the Pattern

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1. Draw a straight line the approximate  length of the sock.

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2. Align the top of the foot with the straight line. Then draw the outline of the bottom of the foot and heel.

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3. Continue the outline. Align the shin with the straight line. Then draw the outline of the calf/leg up to the cuff.

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4. Add (1/4-inch or 6mm) seam allowance to the bottom of the foot, heel, calf, and sock cuff.
Tip: If you add too much allowance, and the sock is too loose, you can tighten it by re-sewing the seam later. If the sock is too tight because there wasn’t enough seam allowance, you have to start over.

Cutting

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1. Cut the paper pattern out with scissors.

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2. Fold your fabric in half. Align the straight line of your pattern with the fabric fold. Pin the pattern to the fabric.

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3. Cut the fabric following the pattern. Do not cut along the fabric fold.

Repeat this process for the second sock.

Sewing

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1. Unfold the fabric and lay it flat.

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2. Fold the cuff over toward the inside of the sock.

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3. Then sew the cuff.  (Optional: Sew lace onto cuff.)

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4. With right-sides facing, fold the sock along the top of the foot and shin (so the sock is inside out).

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5. Sew the seam along the bottom of the foot and back of the leg. Don’t sew the cuff opening shut!

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6. Turn the sock right side out. And VOILA!

Sewing Tips

  • Straight stitch looks better for small socks. The zig-zag stitch is more elastic and forgiving.
  • Match the type of needle with the type of fabric.

FAQ

Please add your comments and questions using the Comments feature, below.

Wednesdayrevised

Ask Wednesday a question

BJDmagazine would like to introduce our new sharp-witted columnist, Wednesday.

She’s young, but don’t be fooled by her looks. She is opinionated and passionate about all things BJD.

If you have questions about any topic—sewing, face-ups, wig-making, photography, and collecting—she will ask the experts and help you find the answers.

To send her a question, use this contact form.

Check back weekly, on Wednesday, to see her latest column.