Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Tutorial: Creating a BJD Head and Face with Linda Macario

In this tutorial, Linda Macario, the Italian BJD doll-maker, shows us how to sculpt a BJD head and apply a face-up.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Click any image to see it in full size.

Materials

  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Box cutter
  • Fine sand paper
  • Sculpting tools
  • Paint Brushes (Larger for coating, 00 for fine lines)
  • Makeup sponge
  • Polystyrene
  • LaDoll or DAS (air-drying paper clay)
  • Modeling paste (e.g., by LaDoll)
  • Chalk powder (or chalk sticks which you can grind into a powder)
  • Acrylic paints
  • Glass eyes
  • Thick wire (stiff enough to hold its shape under elastic tension)
  • Eye protection, protective gloves.
  • Dremmel tool with spherical grinding attachment (see picture in tutorial)

Draw the face and Create the Core

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Draw the front and side view of doll’s head in full scale (1:1).

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

On a separate sheet of paper, draw outlines of the front and side views, but 5mm smaller than the original drawings. Then cut them out.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Cut a cube of polystyrene and trace the head shapes on it. Then cut the excess polystyrene and refine the block to obtain the head core.

Sculpt the Face

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Cover the polystyrene core with a layer of Ladoll clay (5mm thick). Let the covered core dry. Once dry, draw a center vertical line and a horizontal eye line.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Sketch the facial features on the head, following the original design.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add clay for the eyes, eyebrows, nose, mouth and cheeks.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Remember to look at your head from all view points while you are sculpting. It’s very important for the final result.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add details to the face, shaping the eyes, nostrils and lips. The eyeballs are recessed relative to the eyelids.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Sculpt the eyelids and refine the nose and mouth.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Model all particulars with care, preserving balance and proportions.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add clay where you need it (here I’ve added some to the forehead.) Remove any excess. Let the clay dry.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Draw the ears in the correct position on the dry clay. The ears should be positioned between the corner of the eye and the corner of the mouth.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Create a small ear with clay.

sLinda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Wet the clay on the head where the ear will go. Then place the ear on the head.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add the external ear fold.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add the inner ear fold, like a small letter C. Then create the deepest points by pushing them in with a sculpting tool. The ear is done. (Making ears requires a lot of practice. Don’t get discouraged if it’s not good on the first try.)

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Repeat for the other ear. Be sure to position the ears at the same height.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Once again, inspect the head from different angles and check details. Let the head dry fully.

Create the Eye Openings

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Trace a line around the top of the head, right behind the ears. Draw an arrow at the top center point of the head.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Cut the head along the line.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Make holes through the center of the eyes. When you look inside the head, you can see the location of the eyes.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Follow the safety precautions for using the Dremel, such as wearing eye-protection and protective gloves.

Using the Dremel inside the head, carefully grind out the eye sockets.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

These are the eye sockets.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Flatten two similar balls of clay and squeeze them into the eye sockets. Then press in the eyes into the clay.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

From the front, use a sculpting tool to remove the excess clay. Then position the eyes as you want them.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Here is the face after the eyes have been positioned.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Secure the eyes in place by adding  some clay over the eyes inside the head.

Create the Head Articulation

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Cut a round hole where the head connects to the neck.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add some clay to the hole.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Gently press the neck ball into the clay to create the head joint socket.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Rejoin the front and back of the head with some clay. Then let it air-dry completely.

Coat the Head

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

With fine sand paper, smooth the head. Then wipe the surface with a damp cloth.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Mix the colored paints and add some water to obtain a skin tone coating.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add modeling paste and chalk base to get the coating to a creamy consistency.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Paint the head with 4 layers of coating.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Clean the eyes. Your head is ready to paint.

Create the Elastic Hook

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Create a hole for the elastic bands in the head joint socket.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Make two holes and a groove on the top center of the head.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Create a hook with a wire.

Insert the hook through the head joint socket so it comes out the front hole.

sLinda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Bend the long part of the hook  so it sits in the groove and goes back down the other hole.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Adjust the bends so you can still see the hook like this.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Cover with a little clay.

Paint the Head

sLinda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Prepare a certain color to paint the head.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Use very diluted acrylic paints and apply them to the makeup sponge.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Apply a light coat of paint to the circled areas. (Do not draw these lines on the face.)

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

With a pencil, draw two lines for the eyebrows.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Add color to the lips.

Linda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

With a 00 brush, paint the eyelashes, eyebrows, and fine lines on the lips.

stLinda Macario BJD Face-sculpting Tutorial

Tiny Feet magazine online

Current Issue | Tiny Feet Magazine

Tiny Feet Magazine is a beautiful online magazine for doll and miniature lovers. The layout is bright and spacious, with large colorful photographs of dolls in a playful fantastic scenarios, light on text. The online magazine has virtual pages that flip, just like a gloss print magazine. You can view the current issue for free online. Past issues are available for 5.99 euros.

Tiny Feet magazine online

Zombify A BJD Today

Cindy Sowers, who sells OOAK doll hats and dolls on Etsy, took the day off to photograph and transform some Monster High dolls into ZOMBIES! using the Halloween-themed photo editing tools at picmonkey. You can see her pics on her blog at A Dollie A Day.

Monster High Dolls

Picmonkey has six photo-editing themes: vampires, zombies, day of the dead, demons, and trick or treat. picmonkey photo-editing tools for halloween

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A Chat with Bimong, BJD Artist

We had a lovely chat with Bimong, the amazing artist who creates The Narin and Narae BJDs. He tells us about their translucent skins, delicate features and his love of harmonious proportions.

BJDmagazine:How and when did you start designing BJDs?

Bimong: I started designing BJDs 11years ago.  I posted pictures of my work on the internet, and that is how people found me.

BJDmagazine: Were you trained as a doll artist? What is your artistic background?

Bimong: I worked in animation in Korea when I was in my early 20s.

BJDmagazine: What other doll artist do you admire?

Bimong: I admire the Japanese  BJD artist Yoshko Hori.

BJDmagazine: What attracted you to BJDs?

Bimong: I was attracted to their form, the esthetics of the sphere, the realism of the features, as well as the curved lines of the bones and muscles.

BJDmagazine: What sizes of dolls do you design? Do you have a favorite size to work with? Do you ever want to work bigger or smaller?

Bimong: I have designed dolls as tall as 160 cm, and as small as 18 cm.  But  my favorite BJD size is 40 cm. This year, I want to make a couple 160-175 cm dolls.

BJDmagazine: When designing the joints, what’s most important to you? Can you describe the process of designing the joints for us?

Bimong: When designing the joints, I like to experiment and to think of them in new ways.   The most important thing for  me is to preserve the esthetics of the sphere, and a harmonious balance.

BJDmagazine: What is your ideal face sculpt? What do you seek to achieve with each sculpt? What place does realism play in your designs?What are your inspirations for the sculpts?

Bimong: I like faces of mixed ethnic origin.  All my dolls’ faces are a result of my imagination.

BJDmagazine: What materials do you work with when creating your master dolls?

Bimong: I use Stone Clay (Pacdo soft) & epoxy putty.

BJDmagazine: Where is the casting done?

Bimong: The casting is done in my Korean copy team’s workroom.

BJDmagazine: Your dolls’ skin have a translucent quality. What type of resin do you use?

Bimong: I use French resin (which is  innocuous to humans). It is my favorite resin.

BJDmagazine: How often do you create new sculpts?

Bimong: I usually create new sculpts every 3 to 6 months.

BJDmagazine: Are you working on a new sculpt right now and if yes, can you tell us more about it?

Bimong: Right now, I am working on 3 new sculpts. Chuu’s body (USD size), Mindulrae’s body (MSD size) and a 60cm new Narin and Narae’s body.

 

You can find Bimong on: 

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/bimong11/

His Website: http://art-bimong.com/

 

Please help us by linking, tweeting, and sharing this article with your friends.

 

 

 

 

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Minoru World Tiny Fairy Riding Patrick Ball Jointed Doll (BJD) | Angel Dolls BJD UK

“Royal Riding – Patrick

Type: Patrick Boy or Dandy Body – Normal skin

Outfit: Royal Riding – Design By Marie Blossom mass-produce by Arijam

Shoes: Lace-up boots – White

Wig: Shaggy – Ash Blonde”

via Minoru World Tiny Fairy Riding Patrick Ball Jointed Doll (BJD) | Angel Dolls BJD UK.

doll-fan.com • Full Set BJD Planetdoll Riz in BlueBerry*Bunny

doll-fan.com • Full Set BJD Planetdoll Riz in BlueBerry*Bunny

“Me and my Mom decided to do a full set girl. This is a BJD planetdoll Riz, that I have given a face up and full body blushing, and of course my Mom designed her outfit. We had so much fun creating her.”

via doll-fan.com • View topic – Full Set BJD Planetdoll Riz in BlueBerry*Bunny.

doll-fan.com • Full Set BJD Planetdoll Riz in BlueBerry*Bunny

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Hand-crafted BJD jewelry and clothing on Etsy

Are you looking for beautiful hand-crafted BJD jewelry, clothing, and accessories? Are you a creative hand-crafter looking for a community of like minded sellers? If so, check out Etsy’s Doll Couture team. or Team BJD.

These teams function as creative business collectives for individuals who make items for many types of dolls and BJDs.
When you buy from those individuals, you are supporting true artistry, creativity, and handiwork.  You can also accentuate the unique qualities of your BJD with a few carefully selected accessories that aren’t widely available.

One Etsy store, Shiloh Winter Jewelry, is a member of both teams. This business run by mother/daughter pair who are well known for creating beautiful wigs and jewelry from diverse materials. Their work has been shown in Haute Doll Magazine and Fashion Doll Quarterly.